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JULY  2018

BUDO  BROTHERS

MARTIAL  ARTS  

LIFESTYLE  

MAGAZINE

 
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A LETTER FROm

BUDO BROTHERS

 

Dear Fellow Martial Artists,

We've been traveling like crazy lately and all these trips have inspired us to kick off yet another new initiative: BBTV. That's right, we're going to keep the cameras rolling as we continue to live out our mission of connecting like-minded martial artists, sharing knowledge, dreaming up cool new products, and serving our community. Instead of "producing" videos, we're taking a "documentation" approach where we simply film everything; The ups, the downs, and all the entertaining missteps in between. In this month's issue we showcase our first two episodes. We'll be releasing new episodes on the regular, so be sure to subscribe to our youtube channel to keep up to date with our shenanigans :)

One of our recent trips saw us head down to California where we were lucky enough to train with Mark Mikita and visit his school in Los Angeles. We both had our mind blown by Mark's unique philosophies & perspectives as he generously shared so many paradigm shifting concepts with us that we are now thrilled to share with you. One thing is for sure, this man has blazed his own trail, and we couldn't help but admire his drive for excellence. It's rare to meet such a talented practitioner with such an interesting and unique outlook when it comes to teaching, training, and helping his students grow as individuals. When it comes to Mark's style of training, he places equal emphasis on the beautiful and sophisticated Filipino martial arts, and their brutal application in actual combat. Teaching battle-proven techniques and strategies for dealing with every aspect of a violent encounter, Mark urges his students to regularly venture outside their comfort zones to test and hone their ability to make intelligent decisions and effectively act upon them under stress. Meeting Mark in person, and being blessed with the honor of training with him at a recent seminar,  we are excited to share a glimse of his knowledge in this month's issue. Please enjoy!

As you can imagine, all this travelling has made it difficult to execute on all the different initiatives we currently have on the go. As such, we really feel like we haven't been able to put enough focus and attention on promoting the launch of the Budo Youth Fund Training Grant. Without a proper marketing push, we haven't seen the traction we'd like in terms of submitted applications. Actually, it's been a total flop! Right now we only have 13 families that have applied... our goal was at least 50 applicants! In that light: 

 

We are going to extend the deadline for the Budo Youth Fund grant applications to August 31st to allow us to reach more families that could really use the help.

 

Thanks so much for helping us get the word out there about our registered non-profit, The Budo Youth Fund. You are helping us carry out the most rewarding work we could possibly be doing.

With Gratitude,

- Budo Brothers

 
 
 
 

FEATURED BUDO Brother

Mark Mikita

 
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Whenever I'm asked to chart out the path I've taken as a martial artist, I hesitate... not because it would be difficult to scribble out a chronologically ordered list of the various teachers I've trained with, but because many of the more important steps I've taken and lessons I've learned along the way had nothing to do with that traditional teacher-student paradigm. Moreover, I've never been one to put much stock in the whole lineage thing. When it comes to teaching, who you studied with makes very little difference unless you distinguished yourself as a teacher with your own voice and unique point of view. No one needs or wants a teacher who is merely parroting the words of their teacher, no matter how famous he was, or his teacher was, or his teacher's teacher was... blah, blah, blah. Ultimately, no matter who you study with, it is you who teaches the art to yourself. Imitating your teacher may seem like the way to go, but imitating is not creating and art is about creativity. Creativity in the martial arts is no different than it is in painting or dance. It's about not being bound by the medium of the art, but being free to spontaneously create effective technique in the moment, without relying on memory or being in any way compelled to follow a particular approach because of the influence of a teacher, no matter how skillful or famous he was. No one who understands that wants to study with an imitator, but to be an original requires a combination of personality traits that is rare in any field of endeavor. To align yourself with a particular school or teacher provides a sense of security and camaraderie that can be very appealing, but no one who embraces that approach will ever be anything more than a follower.

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Over the years, a veritable legion of misguided individuals have come through the door of my school with their nifty little certificates in hand, presuming that their 'certified instructor' status would mean something to me. It didn't. A sheet of paper that you spent an inordinate amount of money to get signed by whoever doesn't tell me that you have taken possession of the art to such a depth and degree that your personal insights will be of value to students. On the contrary, it will more than likely send the message that the opposite is true. It 'certifies' that you're willing to tow the party line, to kowtow to a teacher or organization to get a piece of paper. I wouldn't study with such a teacher myself and I certainly wouldn't allow them to infect my students with that approach to learning and mastering these arts. So, when it comes to my path, how do I shine light on the things that have made me who I am? It's certainly not an easy thing to do... I had a teacher in high school who refused to do things the way the board of education required. When we were supposed to be visiting a government building to gain some understanding of what those corrupt bureaucrats were doing with our tax dollars, he took us instead to a car dealership to learn how to buy a car without getting ripped off. His whole approach was to teach us how to navigate in the real world. Great teacher. Around that same time, I met a physician who took a similarly iconoclastic approach to health and healing. His influence utterly changed the course of my life and, coupled with the self-discipline I had developed through training in the martial arts as a boy, his simple, uncompromising approach to treating my body right is the key reason I have always been able to stay in great shape. Great teacher. My mother and father taught me about honor and integrity. They also made it very clear that learning was not a passive endeavor. They instilled the notion that it was my job to 'steal' knowledge, meaning it was up to me to ask questions and to be voracious in learning anything that was of interest to me. It's also their influence that inspired me to expand my interests and study science, culture, traditions, history and art. That approach to becoming a better man made me a better martial artist and teacher as well. By comparison, the time I spent learning a technique or principle from a particular martial arts teacher was important but nowhere near as influential. My personal passion for learning the martial arts was built on a solid foundation poured by those other 'peripheral' mentors and teachers, and it is to them that I feel most indebted. As to the path I have followed, I studied tradition Korean, Japanese and Chinese martial arts for decades. At the same time, I trained in western fencing, boxing and kickboxing. Inspired by my father's wartime experiences fighting in the Philippines, I sought out Filipino martial arts at an early age and have continued to seek out new teachers and new perspectives in those brilliant arts.

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The Filipino martial arts are the foundation of what I teach and I have distinguished myself as a teacher by having my own point of view, my own insights and my own way of teaching. I follow no particular teacher and am beholding to no political organization. If you study with me, you will be the teacher, as it will be up to you to steal the art from me and teach it to yourself. My job is to provide an environment that is most conducive to that approach, an environment where you can ask questions and get detailed answers rather than vague 'concepts' or stories about what other people supposedly do or once did. We train smart, meaning you won't ever be thrown into a pit to engage in machismo-based weapon sparring that encourages you to lead with your head and disregard developing an effective defense. You'll learn to take the offensive initiative swiftly and intelligently and hold onto it with the indomitable prowess that distinguishes an Eskrimador from a testosterone-addled Neanderthal with a stick. Most importantly, though, you'll have the opportunity to change your life's path and actually become the person you have always aspired to be. I don't believe that anyone who walks though my door wants only to learn my art but is otherwise fully satisfied with who they are. Training for potentially decades to win a fight you will very likely never have is a waste of time, but utilizing those years of dedication and discipline to become the best version of yourself that you can possibly be is a noble and worthwhile endeavor. So there you have it. That's my path and I invite you to join me in forging it.

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For more information on Mark Mikita and his school, check these links out:

Instagram: @markmikita

facebook: Mark.Mikita

Website: www.fightology.com

 
 
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Bonus Content

 

Video Interview With Mark Mikita

 

The Meaning Behind The Mural

 

 

SKILLS OF THE MONTH

Mark Mikita

 
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Skill #1 - The Classic Error

 

Skill #2 - The Sumbrada Flow Drill

 

Skill #3 - Stick Disarms

 

Skill #4 - Translating Empty Hands From Knife

 

Skill #5 - Wrist Locks

 
 

budo brothers tv

BBTV

 
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New Initiative: BBTV

That's right, we're keeping the cameras rolling and will spill everything all over BBTV - All our screw-ups, successes, near-misses, and all the trouble we get into along our journey. Our first couple episodes highlight our recent trip to California. You get to see some behind the scenes footage of our "Condo-Based Fulfillment Center" (Don't worry, we are finally growing out of this and actually moving into a big-boy center soon!

First we had to pack up our store and hand it off to Kyle's sister for her to fullfill orders while we're off shooting our second Digital Seminar with Grand Master Felix Roiles of the indigenous Filipino Martial Art called Pakamut. But, anytime we're in California, we gotta say hi to the coolest cat we know: Sifu Singh. Check out these first two episodes and be sure to subscribe to our youtube channel as we continually release new vids of travels.

 
 

BBTV Episode-1

 
 
 

BBTV Episode-2

Thanks for watching! 

 
 
 

Budo Youth Fund

Deadline Extension

 
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We need to turn up the heat!!!

Here's why: Our initial response has been pretty dismal! Our goal was to have at least 50 families apply, and we are sitting at 13! So clearly we are not doing something right. So, we are going ratchet up our marketing spend and try to spread more awarness over the next 6 weeks. 

 

We are extending the deadline to August 31st

We want to find the most deserving youth across North America and get them started on their martial arts journey! We need all hands on deck to help spread the word about this initiative that we are so thrilled to be spearheading. 

 
 
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how the process works:

Fill out the grant application to the best of your ability and clearly outline why your son or daughter should be selected from the many applicants to receive grant funding to get started, or continue, their martial arts journey. We will evaluate your application and do our homework on the instructor that you chose to make sure there is a dedicated youth program in place.  Once due diligence is complete and everything checks out, we will shortlist the top candidates for funding and notify you by email of your selection. 

Once you've been added to the shortlist, it is now time to determine the winners!  All shortlisted candidates will submit a video (simply shot on your smart phone) of you and/or your son or daughter explaining why they want to start training. It's hard to get a sense what people are like through words alone, so we feel like a video will be the best way to connect with you. Winners can get up to one year of tuition payed for by the Budo Youth Fund. 

Please note that we really want these funds to go toward families that could really use the help. So if you can afford training, please make room for someone who might not be able to :) 

Application deadline is August 31st

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THANK YOU FOR SUBSCRIBING!

As always, if you have any feedback, suggestions for new topics, or requests for new products, please don't hesitate to reach out!